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A Fish Dinner in Memison

Clam Chowder

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by , October 12th, 2007 at 10:00 AM (810 Views)
Manhattan clam chowder, that is. I know most people think New England clam chowder is the only sort worth eating, but they're just wrong. John Thorne's Serious Pig has three full chapters on chowders, and a lot of them are worth considering (see "Salmon Chowder", below).

Here's my grandma's recipe:
Ollie's Clam Chowder

4 strips smoky bacon
2 pints shucked clams [about two dozen large clams], minced
1 bottle clam juice (optional)
1 14-oz can tomatoes
salt, pepper, Worcestershire sauce, - teaspoon thyme
2 medium potatoes, diced
1 cup carrots, diced
1 cup celery, diced

Dice the bacon. Cook until crisp in a 4-quart pot. Drain out all but 1 tablespoon of the fat.

Add 2 quarts of water and bring it to a boil. Add the clam juice and any liquor from the clams; if you've shucked them yourself, you won't need any bottled clam juice because you'll have lots.

Push tomatoes through a strainer or food mill and add. Add seasonings to taste. Add celery and carrots and cook for 20 minutes; add the potatoes and cook for 20 minutes more.

Correct seasonings, add clams and cook briefly.

Updated October 12th, 2007 at 10:05 AM by Theophylact

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  1. EXreaction's Avatar
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    Yep, that makes for some killer Clam Chowder. It is pretty much the same as the recipe I used (except heavy cream instead of tomatoes) when I made it...but mine was a bit bigger of a portion.

    2 pounds of diced bacon (the good stuff, applewood smoked, the stuff that is $5-6/lb)
    4 onions diced
    1 head of celery diced (optional)
    4 cans (46 oz each) of clams in clam juice (fresh clams would be better)
    add cream mixture after removing bay leaves/thyme (listed below)
    1-2 Tb Worcestershire sauce
    5lb of russet potatoes (diced)
    Salt & white pepper to taste

    (made in a seperate pot)
    1 1/4-1 1/2 gallons of heavy whipping cream
    2-3 bay leaves, and some fresh thyme
    (heat to a simmer, then remove from heat and let it cool off on it's own)

    It was damned good.
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