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Thread: Please guide me

  1. #1

    Please guide me

    Dear friends
    I have done a 4 year degree in information systems from IP university in 2004 later i joined a BPO for six months as at that time there was recession in market. In 2005 I got my first job in a software company for one year i worked without salary then the company start to pay me. One of my senior help me to understand programming and .net as I was almost zero in programming as in my college days I hardly write a program still I manage to work in the beginig it was tough for me as and I avoid to go to office as programming scared me but later I start working but in 2008 one of the person intimate the boss that I am looking for change and was on interview . So my boss became angry and fired me . After that it was again recession in2008 so I was not able to find the job I click to a school for my pocket money now recently I met an accident and again tring for a software company as when I was in schoolI hardly got the time for interviews and for prepration as now I am at home I am planning for it. But now I find it much more difficult to learn and write code I got bore early I always plan to write code but now I am running from that as I was not a good programmer in the starting phase now this gap.
    So I was wondering should I quit.
    Please guide me guys
    Thanks
    Waiting for help.

  2. #2
    THE Gimp Clown Fish! nemowolf's Avatar
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    waiting for something readable ...

    I realize from your username that your not from the US or even an english speaking country but i dont understand even half what you wrote. Please try to cut it into understanable peices so it is easier for us to understand what it is your trying to say. I got lost half way through your biography and didnt see what you actually are asking.

    I cant help you until you help us understand what your saying.

    TechIMO Folding@home Team #111 - Crunching for the cure!

  3. #3
    AGW Trained Seal tony_j15's Avatar
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    If you don't enjoy coding and aren't good at it, then perhaps you should seek training in a new line of work.

  4. #4
    Ultimate Member PoonDoggy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tony_j15 View Post
    If you don't enjoy coding and aren't good at it, then perhaps you should seek training in a new line of work.
    What he said.
    "The passion for setting people right is in itself an afflictive disease." Marianne Moore, American poet (1887-1972)

  5. #5
    Ultimate Member Interrupt's Avatar
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    Okay, this is totally random since I can't understand what he's saying either but... you know what field is great for folks that aren't exceptional software designers but can grasp the basics of coding? Databasing. Okay I know some folks here are going to argue that if someone dislikes coding or, more over, SQL functions & the like that extensive DB work isn't for them.

    But I don't know. I've been considering DB work too since I did do a lot of MS Access work. That isn't to say I know/am good at SQL "coding," but I know how to work with databases and think it enjoyable. Now to actually get into DB? Isn't for me but it might be for some people. Right?

    Not sure this applies to you, OP, as you pretty much dislike coding (hey, if a company held meetings for you to learn about coding and you didn't go you probably don't have the patience required to attend such classes). But if you're asking what you can do to brush up on a related programming field I'd say go for MS certs all geared for databasing (and yes, classes, not online since classes are best - I've found - for fields you know very little about). If that's something you want I do have charts of career paths relating to DB certifications I can get you: all you'd need to do is find classes in your area.

    Btw... you could always change up programming languages... some people hate C but love Church and lambda calculus... dunno, thinking out loud.

    Now if you don't like programming but want to stay in IT... I don't know what to tell you! The sky is the limit (barring economic concerns, learning disabilities, low IQs or a general lack of mechanical knowledge of course!). Do a bit of research or, in your next post, tell us all what you'd like to do (not what you don't like to do... which isn't very helpful! ).

    Again... really just a shot in the dark seeing as how I'm not sure what you're asking. Just trying to be helpful.
    Last edited by Interrupt; October 7th, 2011 at 12:42 PM.
    “Arguing with anonymous strangers on the Internet is a sucker's game because they almost always turn out to be—or to be indistinguishable from—self-righteous sixteen-year-olds possessing infinite amounts of free time.” ― Cryptonomicon

  6. #6
    THE Gimp Clown Fish! nemowolf's Avatar
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    excellent suggestion! I hadnt thought of DBA programming and that brings up something completely different.

    Business Intelligence is a VERY promisiong career path as more and more companies want more then convuluted and overly plump excel worksheets with so much infomation from their DBs that they dont know what or how to read it. Enter BI and their ability to interprit the needs of their client and develop reports to express the numbers in a meaningful way. This tends to require extensive knowledge of DBs, SQL (you needs to know the maths and formulas) and be able to pick up what the client is putting down as you work through iterations of reports to get the numbers just as the client wants.

    That keeps you out of the true programming field yet still keep your edumacation useful and relavant. You in turn stay in the realm of IT, sort of, and get to work with peoples at the same time.

    just my two cents... if you ever come back.

    TechIMO Folding@home Team #111 - Crunching for the cure!

  7. #7
    Dear friends
    First of all let me thank you for you wonderful support & help.
    I apologize for the trouble you guys faced with my typing I met an accident and not able to type with my right hand as it got injured.
    Its not like that, that I hate coding In fact I want to be a very good coder. I love to watch and imagine how the people become hacker. But the problem with me that I am not a constant learner, I can’t read a topic for more than 30 minutes; I got bored very easily with any topic. In school time I wasn’t same. Now for example if I am reading WPF or WCF I’ll read books first 2-3 pages and then start doing anything like watching movie or surf net or chat over phone, and then I switch to that topic after 7-8 days till then I forgot the things & my rhythm also. One more thing I try to switch technology for example if a person told me java is good I start reading that if another told me go for SAP I start searching for its tutorial. This might be the reason I stuck on the same position for last 4 years in my previous software development company.
    I think I can’t make my decisions. I tried to change the stream when I lost my job I worked as a teacher in a school but wasn’t satisfy I want something much more technical work after 2 years I left the school also.
    Hope now I would be readable. Now please guide me as now I have 2 years gap also, how can I make a comeback in software development, how can I make myself to study the topics.
    Or should I quit and opt another line.
    I again apologize if there is any typing error as I am still not well.
    Please guide me guys
    Thanks
    Waiting for help.

  8. #8
    Ultimate Member Interrupt's Avatar
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    I hate to say it but you're going to need to change your habits if you want to learn anything new (studying for 30 minutes at a time is akin to sleeping all day). Yes, you can learn to be a computer technician by hands on experience only, someone literally showing you (many of my friends are in this category), but if you are going to take it to the next level and get certifications and take exams you have to do a little more studying.

    Not saying being a technician is what you want, I'm simply offering that as an example since I have experience in that. Every single field requires some level of dedication. The dedication and studying doesn't guarantee success or a job in IT (you can also suck at something after studying 70 hours a week... this is exceptionally true with technology, some people just don't "get" related concepts). But unless you are willing to put in that kind of time you're going to find IT is a very rough field to get into: as it is jobs - if you find them - are very competitive and rely on diversified talents.

    The fact that you worked for a company at all is a feather in your cap, so to speak. It can be made to give you some sort of "leg up" as far as job experience in IT or corporate is concerned but many people do have corporate backgrounds, you further highlight your talents through schooling and/or "talents."

    How can you make yourself study? By telling yourself if you don't study for something there's a good chance you won't get very far in life. If technology isn't for you, get out of it and find something that IS for you. By the sounds of it a technical field isn't for you but I could be wrong: if it is, prove it to yourself through study. If it isn't for you maybe focus on business administration or... something?? Everything requires dedication though (except maybe working at McDonalds).

    Dude. You got good schooling you say, right? You had a positive mentality once? Get it back, sit down and focus. And if you really are willing to buckle down and study there's lots of options in IT or related fields for you that people can advise you on. If it is IT: what fields interest you enough to study a lot? Does the idea of creating a corporations entire data management system turn you on? Or maybe you like the power and responsibility of a network admin? Or maybe you want to get back into software design but want to go for an easier language?

    Sky is the limit but the first step is mastery over the self (I've always wanted to say that).

    Edit: As to the hacker comment - do you mean reverse engineering and tinkering with coding? Messing with web based applications? or actual computer security and internet protocols? From experience I can tell you computer security requires more studying and more reading (being up to date) than any other computer field that I know of (to do it right, that is). Each one of those topics are distinct fields of computer security and/or programming, contain certifications (not "for hacking" obviously), and do have job potential. The "hacking" you see in movies? All fake. But feel free to describe your interests in depth more and maybe there's a hope that you can learn one of these related fields.

    Sec Edit: If you are looking into sec I'd say the A+ and/or N+ (I'd say A+ is good for PC foundational knowledge but many on the forum would skip to N+, consider getting both... honestly, it looks good and you'll be shocked at the stuff you don't know), Linux+ is a MUST, Security+ is a MUST, SCP maybe, MCSA & CCNA are helpful (if you go Cisco, the CCSP/CISP route is always useful so says a Cisco buddy but I don't know too much about that; if you go Microsoft, MCSE or whatever they call it these days is a feather in the cap) & CEH is new but worth a look.

    Also really useful is knowledge of Backtrack (yes I realize giving someone new to computer security backtrack is akin to giving a kid a loaded gun but since I use it regularly and love it I thought I'd give her a bit of attention ). Classes are available online @ Information Security Training by Offensive Security They look sweet on the resume!!! As do the other Linux certs.

    As you can see though... with computer security everything is very helpful. The more you know the better. I've done a tad bit of computer security work but never worked toward any particular certification for it (but the jobs I've held weren't strictly for sec, if you're looking for sec-only jobs you want those certs). So I'm sure someone else here can better help you with that route if you're serious about it.

    Important thing here is that if you focus too much in one area you won't be very marketable but if you spread yourself too thin it'll look like you're not really into your chosen field (or rather, it'll look like you have no specialized experience). Companies REALLY want people with specialities (the flip side of course being that they don't want to pay for them but that's an argument for another time). Plan your job, write your resume and apply to jobs accordingly.
    Last edited by Interrupt; October 11th, 2011 at 01:09 PM.
    “Arguing with anonymous strangers on the Internet is a sucker's game because they almost always turn out to be—or to be indistinguishable from—self-righteous sixteen-year-olds possessing infinite amounts of free time.” ― Cryptonomicon

  9. #9
    THE Gimp Clown Fish! nemowolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marknjas033 View Post
    Sky is the limit but the first step is mastery over the self (I've always wanted to say that).
    That right there is the best advise i have seen EVARH!!!

    Seriously, if you cant make yourself buckle down and down the learning, then get out of IT so someone who can do the work and learn how to do it right can get the job.

    TechIMO Folding@home Team #111 - Crunching for the cure!

  10. #10
    Thanks a lot guys for help and support . I have to be dedicated what ever the field I chose.

  11. #11
    THE Gimp Clown Fish! nemowolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by abhishek.kashyap View Post
    Thanks a lot guys for help and support . I have to be dedicated what ever the field I chose.
    It takes dedication to start something and stick with it...

    It takes time to continue learning and practice something to get good at it...

    It takes a lifetime to make anything an art form and master it.

    TechIMO Folding@home Team #111 - Crunching for the cure!

  12. #12
    Ultimate Member Interrupt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nemowolf View Post
    It takes dedication to start something and stick with it...

    It takes time to continue learning and practice something to get good at it...

    It takes a lifetime to make anything an art form and master it.
    Wow... you're good nemo, you got me beat there! We're becoming the IMO Monks.
    “Arguing with anonymous strangers on the Internet is a sucker's game because they almost always turn out to be—or to be indistinguishable from—self-righteous sixteen-year-olds possessing infinite amounts of free time.” ― Cryptonomicon

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