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  1. #1
    Ultimate Member mad1's Avatar
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    Drywall Mud trying temperature?

    What is the minimum temperature for drywall mud to dry?

  2. #2
    Ultimate Member nunyadam's Avatar
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    somewhere above freezing, of course the cooler and more humid the area the longer it will take to dry. You can also use a fan to help speed the drying time. I would imagine the recomended temp is somewhere around 60f or higher.

    TechIMO Folding@home Team #111 - Crunching for the cure!

  3. #3
    Instigator Atomic Rooster's Avatar
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    Typically the lowest is 50F for most compounds.
    Unofficial TechIMO record holder for the number of times being added and removed from beemer's ignore list.

  4. #4
    Ultimate Member mad1's Avatar
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    I became involved in a heated discuccion with the sales rep. at the builders office yesterday. I requested that the furnace not be run while the drywall was being sanded to prevent buildup f drywall dust in the duct work and in the furnace.My oldest daughter has allergies and I want the duct work as clean as possible when I move in. The HVAC person that I uses stated this can buildup in the furnace and cause problems.Once I take posession I will have a electronic air purifier system installed on the furnace.

    The sales rep continued to tell me that is the way all builders do the drywall. I asked here if everyone else jumped off a bridge would she do it to. I continued to request that the furnace not be used during the drywall sanding.I then told her I would supply heaters if the temperature deemed necessary.

    When I do mudding I use the unmixed, there is no sanding needed. I take about 5 thin coats then scrape off the small bumps, use a quality primer and then paint.

    So long story short she stated that the owner would contact me this week.
    Last edited by mad1; September 4th, 2006 at 01:58 PM.

  5. #5
    Ultimate Member nunyadam's Avatar
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    The only time they would have any need to run the furnace is to hasten the drying time. as long as they shut it off after it is dry and then sand it should not be a problem.

    TechIMO Folding@home Team #111 - Crunching for the cure!

  6. #6
    The Jiggawatts, Marty! tony_j15's Avatar
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    running the heater is totally unnecessary except to keep the mud from freezing.
    All 1.21 of them.

  7. #7
    Ultimate Member mad1's Avatar
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    I found some information on Carrier's, furncae that is to be installed, regarding the use of the furnace during construction. Carreir states that it is ok as long as certain criteria are met, the major that I see is that suppy air to the furnace is to come from a outside source not the air circulated in the home. This would be sufficient to relieve some of my concerns if the weather required that heating of the home was necessary. The other issue that concerns the external air suppling the furncae has to be at least 55deg.

    "This gas furnace may be used for construction heat provided that:
    The furnace is permanently installed with all electrical wiring,
    piping, air filters, venting and ducting installed according to
    these installation instructions. A return air duct is provided,
    sealed to the furnace casing, and terminated outside the space
    containing the furnace. This prevents a negative pressure
    condition as created by the circulating air blower, causing a
    flame rollout and/or drawing combustion products into the
    structure.
    The furnace is controlled by a thermostat. It may not be ″hot
    wired″ to provide heat continuously to the structure without
    thermostatic control.
    Clean outside air is provided for combustion. This is to
    minimize the corrosive effects of adhesives, sealers and other
    construction materials. It also prevents the entrainment of
    drywall dust into combustion air, which can cause fouling and
    plugging of furnace components.
    The temperature of the return air to the furnace is maintained
    between 55F (13C) and 80F (27C), with no evening setback
    or shutdown. The use of the furnace while the structure is under
    construction is deemed to be intermittent operation per our
    installation instructions.

    The air temperature rise is within the rated rise range on the
    furnace rating plate, and the firing rate has been set to the
    nameplate value."http://xpedio.carrier.com/idc/groups/public/documents/techlit/58mcb-1si.pdf?SMSESSION=NO


    I have also read the some furnace manufacturers will void the warranty if the furnace is run during the construction of the home!

  8. #8
    Fact Checker Gomer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mad1 View Post
    The other issue that concerns the external air suppling the furncae has to be at least 55deg.
    The temperature of the return air to the furnace is maintained
    between 55F (13C) and 80F (27C), with no evening setback
    or shutdown. The use of the furnace while the structure is under
    construction is deemed to be intermittent operation per our
    installation instructions.
    That statement speaks to the air going to the cold air return from the house, not the external air used for combustion.

  9. #9
    Ultimate Member
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    i would leave the furnace off period..

    contractors normally in cold weather use portable propane
    heaters to supply heat

    the mud should take about two days at 70 degrees to dry,longer
    at the ceiling corners and near the floor

  10. #10
    Ultimate Member Cyclone2's Avatar
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    First off - if they are sanding - then the mud is already dry...

    If they are sanding between mud coats then the best way to help the furnace would be to tape a filter over the cold air return, thus keeping dust out of your vents.

  11. #11
    Anime Otaku RobRich's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclone2 View Post
    First off - if they are sanding - then the mud is already dry...

    If they are sanding between mud coats then the best way to help the furnace would be to tape a filter over the cold air return, thus keeping dust out of your vents.
    Similar thoughts. A quality 3M air filter at the return air duct will take care of the dust issue. Costs about $15 at most home supply stores.

  12. #12
    Ultimate Member mad1's Avatar
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    Just finished talking to the owner, he offered to brind in a alternate heat source or get the supply air from the basement. I stated that either option will work for me.
    My main goal here is to reduce dust in the ductwork and furnace with the main reason for the health of my oldest daugher, she has asthma, and the reduction of dust buildup in the furnace.

  13. #13
    Ultimate Member mad1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobRich View Post
    Similar thoughts. A quality 3M air filter at the return air duct will take care of the dust issue. Costs about $15 at most home supply stores.
    What of the dust that accumulates is the ductwork?

  14. #14
    Ultimate Member mad1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclone2 View Post
    First off - if they are sanding - then the mud is already dry...

    If they are sanding between mud coats then the best way to help the furnace would be to tape a filter over the cold air return, thus keeping dust out of your vents.
    IF the cold air returns are blocked then another source for the cold air return is needed.

  15. #15
    Ultimate Member Cyclone2's Avatar
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    You are not blocking them..... you are covering them with filter material [air will go through, most dust will not]

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