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  1. #21
    Thaumaturge Member howste's Avatar
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    Well, I removed the capacitor and now it gets no power at all. No lights, nothing at all. If I put a wire straight across I get what I got before removing it. Blinking power light, but no charging and no boot.

    It there a way to tell what size the capacitor should be? There are no markings on it.

  2. #22
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    I deleted the text of this post because I didn't know it posted - I thought I stopped it.

    I realized after the fact that the device removed wasn't a capacitor.
    Last edited by ShineOn; January 31st, 2009 at 10:33 PM.

  3. #23
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    I don't think you pulled a capacitor.

    I think it's an inductor (it's tagged "PL1") "L" on a circuitboard means "inductor," "C" is "Capacitor," "R" is "resistor." These SMT's are all packaged and mounted similarly but have very different purposes. Too bad only resistors seem to actually get any codes printed on them...

    Put it back, and only look at components marked "PC" and leave "PL" alone.

    Inductors will have very little resistance as a matter of course. They are essentially for canceling EM noise when used in a DC circuit.
    Last edited by ShineOn; January 31st, 2009 at 10:55 PM.

  4. #24
    Thaumaturge Member howste's Avatar
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    Doh! Thanks for that. I thought it was PC3, but it looks like PC3 is really a tiny capacitor right next to the power connector. I guess I'll have to keep looking. It's probably on the other side, so I'll have to remove the whole thing...

    Inductor orientation doesn't matter does it? I didn't mark it to replace it in the same orientation. It's just a coil, right?

  5. #25
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    AFAIK, it shouldn't matter.

  6. #26
    Thaumaturge Member howste's Avatar
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    Great, thanks.

  7. #27
    Thaumaturge Member howste's Avatar
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    Well, no luck in finding a shorted capacitor...

  8. #28
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    Problem reaching possibly shorted capacitor

    Hi,

    I am having trouble reaching the possibly short circuited capacitor.


    Can it be reached by just removing screws or should there be some irreversible dissassembly be done?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Possible solutions for burnt-out circuitry on Dell Latitude D505 mobo?-d505capacitor.jpg  

  9. #29
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    You have to disassemble the laptop completely. That shield that covers the bottom of the motherboard comes off. There are screws (usually indicated with arrows, on the top-side of the motherboard - they all have to come out, including the screws that hold the heat-sink and fan in place) plus you have to unscrew the connector posts by the monitor, serial and parallel ports - they hold the metal shield on.


    Do NOT attempt to access the SMD's behind the metal shield without removing the shield first, or you risk further, possibly irreparable, damage. The detection and repair should be done to a bare motherboard with no shielding or other non-electronic case parts attached.

    Don't worry - as long as you remember which screw is which, and remember to plug in all the little connectors you had to unplug, you will be able to put it all back together.

    After determining that the cap is bad (use a multitester like I did to see if it has a dead short across the ends) you need to carefully desolder both ends, gently pulling the bad cap from the solder pads without pulling the solder pads off the circuit board - don't attempt the "dentist" approach of brute-force yanking the cap from the board as though it were a bad tooth, unless you want to turn a fixable component into a piece of toxic landfill...

  10. #30
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    I replaced the power jack on the D505 board and noticed on the top side there is what looks like a jumper wire that is dog-legged over to what I believe is C1 capacitor. Can someone tell me if this is true? I ask because during the jack replacement I used alcohol and a swab to remove flux and somehow I think I wiped away the small wire jumper. I just need to know if there really is a jumper wire and if it only connects to one side of the cap. Attached is the jump I performed. Let me know if this is correct
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Possible solutions for burnt-out circuitry on Dell Latitude D505 mobo?-nor_7058_800x535.jpg  
    Last edited by jberenyi; February 21st, 2009 at 11:55 AM.

  11. #31
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    Correct.

  12. #32
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    can you help me please

    Quote Originally Posted by ShineOn View Post
    brimar,

    I also have the same issue - my D505 works off battery but battery won't charge, and if you plug in the PS the light on the brick goes out. I have my mobo in front of me and see the mosfet you're talking about (PQ12 is silkscreened next to it).

    Not sure where the ceramic cap might be on the underside. You mention CP13, but all the power-related components on my mobo appear to have a P before the component type (PC, PQ, PR, PD, etc.) I found a PC13 in line with the PV3 flexible contact on the underside next to where the power connector is mounted. Hard to tell from visual inspection if it's bad.

    I suppose it could be any of the caps in the power circuit, though...

    How did you connect your low-output PS at your test-bench, and could the resistance test setting of a multitester work as a low-output PS for the purpose of heating up the defective cap?

    (edit) Never mind - I found that cap has a dead short across it using my multimeter's continuity test. Replaced it with one the exact size & shape I snagged from a bad Inspiron 5100 mobo... I'll post back with the results.

    (edit) That did the trick! You're a genius! This little "secret" has GOT to be shouted from the rooftops.

    That just goes to show you that a dead component doesn't have to have any visible signs of damage.
    i there can you help me please i'v got the same truble trying to look for this component i know this is an old post where abouts on the board is it what i need to replace what colour is it can you be greatful to get back to me please from jay

  13. #33
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    i there i know this is an old post but could you help me please on what component to look for what colour is it and where is it on the board thank you from jay

  14. #34
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    Question Can I send either one of you my dell505 to have fixed?

    Quote Originally Posted by brimar View Post
    Yes, it was a D505.


    To get at the capacitor you have to follow the full teardown given on the Dell website as service info for the D505.
    Documentation

    If you can send me a photo of the underside of the board in the area of the power connector I might be able to point out the one I had fail.
    There is some metalwork which obscures the underside of the power connector. I ended up hacking this away with a pair of side cutters whilst trying to trace through the input circuit. I think when I found the cap I realised that I could have got away without doing the hacking. Try a couple of photos from different angles so if the cap was just under the metalwork I could still see it.

    The cap is a fairly large ceramic - on the underside of the board and on its own with the exception of a MUCH smaller ceramic one by one of its pads but the smaller one is rotated 90 degrees to it.
    I think all the other large ceramic capacitors in this area are grouped together.

    You might be able to see some signs of damage to the cap.
    when these fail they can crack. The cracks appear as a lighter cream line in the ceramic body of the cap.

  15. #35
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    Dell D505 green light

    Hi

    I enjoyed reading your message and the work you have done. I have a Dell D505 laptop which stop booting up then last week decided to boot up then stopped. What happens now is when the machine is powered the green light comes on for a couple of seconds then disappears with no activity on the system. The power supply and the battery is fine as I tested with another Dell with the same model.

    I took the machine apart and reseated the memory, cpu, wireless and every little screw but to no success.

    Now, after reading your message, I will venture again to see the capcitor you mentioned. I wonder if power comes from battery or power supply goes through this capacitor.

    Thanks for your help






    Quote Originally Posted by brimar View Post
    Just repaired a laptop with the same symptoms:
    Won't charge the battery, won't power from AC.
    Also if you power the AC adapter when not connected to laptop you get green power LED on the adapter. When you plug it in the laptop the green power LED immediately goes out.

    Opened it up and found SO-8 P-ch mosfet by the DC input socket. Source (pins1,2,3) is connected to the inner barrel (+19.5V), Gate 4 gets driven low, applying the input to the Drain. (pins 5,6,7,8) On my board the drain was short to GND. Applying power directly to the Drain via a current limited bench PSU (set 1A limit) showed a couple of volts.

    Placing a finger on the opposite side of the board revealed a SMT ceramic cap getting hot.
    CP13 I think. Opposite side to the power connector, almost under it. I would guess at 1206 or slightly larger and there is an 0402 cap just next to its bottom pad at 90 degrees to it. Cap was glued before soldering so had to flow both sides at the same time with a soldering iron and force off. Would likely have been 1uF or bigger 25V. Removal restored operation. Runs OK without but would suggest putting something in there 0.1uF 1206 50V, perhaps a couple stacked ?

    BTW you have to strip down everything and remove the main board to get to the cap :-(

    Hope this info is of use to someone....

    (EDIT) correction: cap is PC13. Pic showing location of failed cap - D505fix

    Robin
    die4laser.com

  16. #36
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    Dell D505 Green light for a couple of seconds then nothing

    Hi
    I enjoyed reading your message and the work you have done. I have a Dell D505 laptop which stop booting up then last week decided to boot up then stopped. What happens now is when the machine is powered the green light comes on for a couple of seconds then disappears with no activity on the system. The power supply and the battery is fine as I tested with another Dell with the same model.
    I took the machine apart and reseated the memory, cpu, wireless and every little screw but to no success.
    Now, after reading your message, I will venture again to see the capcitor you mentioned. I wonder if power comes from battery or power supply goes through this capacitor.

    Summary:

    Power green light comes on for a couple of seconds
    No power is going to the motherboard
    Won't boot from battery
    Won't boot from power suply
    Won't boot using fn, printscrn, etc


    Help is appreciated

    Thanks for your help

    Quote Originally Posted by brimar View Post
    Just repaired a laptop with the same symptoms:
    Won't charge the battery, won't power from AC.
    Also if you power the AC adapter when not connected to laptop you get green power LED on the adapter. When you plug it in the laptop the green power LED immediately goes out.

    Opened it up and found SO-8 P-ch mosfet by the DC input socket. Source (pins1,2,3) is connected to the inner barrel (+19.5V), Gate 4 gets driven low, applying the input to the Drain. (pins 5,6,7,8) On my board the drain was short to GND. Applying power directly to the Drain via a current limited bench PSU (set 1A limit) showed a couple of volts.

    Placing a finger on the opposite side of the board revealed a SMT ceramic cap getting hot.
    CP13 I think. Opposite side to the power connector, almost under it. I would guess at 1206 or slightly larger and there is an 0402 cap just next to its bottom pad at 90 degrees to it. Cap was glued before soldering so had to flow both sides at the same time with a soldering iron and force off. Would likely have been 1uF or bigger 25V. Removal restored operation. Runs OK without but would suggest putting something in there 0.1uF 1206 50V, perhaps a couple stacked ?

    BTW you have to strip down everything and remove the main board to get to the cap :-(

    Hope this info is of use to someone....

    (EDIT) correction: cap is PC13. Pic showing location of failed cap - D505fix

    Robin
    die4laser.com

  17. #37
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    Hi
    I enjoyed reading your message and the work you have done. I have a Dell D505 laptop which stop booting up then last week decided to boot up then stopped. What happens now is when the machine is powered the green light comes on for a couple of seconds then disappears with no activity on the system. The power supply and the battery is fine as I tested with another Dell with the same model.
    I took the machine apart and reseated the memory, cpu, wireless and every little screw but to no success.
    Now, after reading your message, I will venture again to see the capcitor you mentioned. I wonder if power comes from battery or power supply goes through this capacitor.
    Thanks for your help

  18. #38
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    Dell D505 won't boot

    I tried to boot the Dell D505 from AC and from Battery but to no success. Everytime I press the power button either with battery or AC or both, I get the green light staying for a second and then goes off without any noise from the laptop.

    Your help is appreciated

  19. #39
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    This may not be the answer to your particular issue but for the sake of 30 seconds worth a try........

    Remove battery and power supply. Hold down power button for 30 seconds. Wipe you fingers across the battery contacts on the laptop.

    Reconnect and try to power up.

    This sometimes does the trick with laptop power problems.

  20. #40
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    FIX FIX FIX!!!!!

    here the fix everyone.!!!

    for symptoms that powers on for seconds and shuts off automatically here's the fix.....

    if pc13 is good(not shorted) resolder the maxim chip "max1978" with iron(small tip),

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