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  1. #1
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    connect 20 pin connector to 24 pin mobo?

    Before i call support. The ASUS mobo I ordered has a 24 pin power connector. The Antec case / power supply has a 20 pin. I just got the case and counted the pins! What is the solution to this one?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Ultimate Member Jarhed7276's Avatar
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    What motherboard are you using? As long as the motherboard has a separate 4 pin connector (a small square 4 wire connection) and the power supply has the 4 pin connector you can just use those and all should be ok.

  3. #3
    Member The_Shooter's Avatar
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    You can still use your 20 pin connector. They just suggest using the 24 pin. I was running my machine on a 20 pin for a couple of months untill my Powersupply died. Then I spent $90 getting a nice powersupply with 24 pin.
    Intel Q6600, Intel DG965WH
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  4. #4
    Ultimas w00t! Mastah... vikeor's Avatar
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    the 24pin power connector is just the usual ATX power connector plus the 4pin 12V one isnt it?
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  5. #5
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    IT's ASUS A8N-E. I went to the Antec's support site, and they say to plug it into the "right most" part of the mobo's connector. So, what is "right?' hahah! The plug is keyed, so it's only going in one way. Newegg has a 20 to 24 pin adaptor @ about $12.

    the 24 pins has something to do with the PCI-Ex16 buss.

  6. #6
    The FNG rrcn's Avatar
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    You don't need an adapter. Like others stated, the 20-pin will work fine. Just plug it into the 24-pin slot and plug in the 4-pin 12V into it's seperate 4-pin slot.

  7. #7
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    There is a seperate place to plug in the 4 conductor one

  8. #8
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    I can post a photo, if this forum takes it...

  9. #9
    Training for Bankai JPMiller's Avatar
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    OK... alot of people seem to be under the impression this is a simple matter...
    It's NOT as easy as "just plug it in and it will be OK"
    Have any of the above posters ever used more than one or even one setup with a different pinout from the PSU?
    In my opinion the Shooter merely got lucky in that he didn't have any major power issues until he upgraded...
    Intel especially, highly recommends a 450W or higher PSU if a converter or adapter is used due to the power loss inherent in the use of an adapter.
    the 4 pin power cable that is "missing" on a standard 20 pin end on most PSU's is absolutely necessary in alot of newer setups.
    If the motherboard has a 24 pin connector, or a seperate 4 pin connecter, one needs to have it plugged in for the board to work correctly...
    There are many more factors involved than just a quick fix or adapter in many cases...
    Im just saying dont take this lightly or make rash desicions and end up frying something if your not sure what your doing...
    Last edited by JPMiller; April 18th, 2005 at 04:55 PM.

  10. #10
    Ultimas w00t! Mastah... vikeor's Avatar
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    check what the mobo manual has to say about this...
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  11. #11
    The FNG rrcn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPMiller
    OK... alot of people seem to be under the impression this is a simple matter...
    It's NOT as easy as "just plug it in and it will be OK"
    Have any of the above posters ever used more than one or even one setup with a different pinout from the PSU?
    I have and the computer still works perfectly fine to this day.

  12. #12
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    The mobo manual says nothing about it. "Plug in the 24 connector... and the "4 pin 12v connector..."

    I called ASUS. Tech said, "get adaptor, then will be all set."

    Currently ever so slightly tweaked with Antec, who "assumes" everything will be okay. This is a new case, from a well-known company.

    I am okay with Antec's "smart power" 350 watt supply. Has 21 v on the 12v rails. With my box, will be running 60-70% maxed out, running the vid card hot, etc. I added it all up, not just watts, but current on the different rails. I am not running dual PCI-E slots, etc.

  13. #13
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    I did a tech support query to Antec. Their web site, which I researched, boasts that their cases are "ATX-12v compliant" under a page entitled, "ATX12V v2.0, PCI Express, and the New Motherboards." I assumed 24 pins... oops, guess again!

    I keep editing my posts:
    http://pics.bbzzdd.com/users/Silvers...4wireguide.jpg
    Last edited by Zoltar; April 18th, 2005 at 06:39 PM.

  14. #14
    Training for Bankai JPMiller's Avatar
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    This is copied off a forum from Anandtech...
    Poster's name... flexy

    (Q) the new "xyx" motherboard has a 24pin plug - so do i need a new 24pin PSU ?

    Not necessarely. All the upcoming new boards (eg. Nforce 4) SHOULD be capable of running with an "old" ATX 1.3 20pin-plug equipped PSU as well as with a new ATX 2.0 24pin PSU.

    The question here is rather whether the PSU itself is a good brand name PSU with sufficient wattage. Dont expect a recent high-end system with pci-express card(s) and A64 CPU to run flawlessly off an old 350W noname PSU.

    (Q) but what about the extra 4 pins on the PSU plug/motherboard connector ?

    These four extra pins on the newer ATX 2.0 PSUs are solely for providing power to the pci-express port . I guess the specs demanded a separation of the power-rails for CPU/motherboard and high-end graphics.
    Therefore they put the additional rails on the plug/motherboard which provides +12V, +5V, +3.3 and GND to the pci-express slot.

    (Q) So..but i got/plan to get a pci-express card !

    pci-express cards will MOSTLY have an external power-connector (6 pin pci-express). You can connect two unused molex connectors from your PSU to this connector on the graphic card via an adapter. If you dont have this adapter - newegg has one
    pci-express power adapter

    (!) a single connector/wire on a PSU/connector is usually rated at a max. power draw of 6A. Wattage = VOLTS*A.
    The maximum wattage for ONE 12V connector is therefore 72A. The two molex connectors are combined since a high-emd graphic card usually uses MUCH MORE than 72W..therefore it uses two molex which should be ok for up to 144 Watts.

    THATS why the pci-ex graphics card SHOULD be able to run fine even WITHOUT the 24pin motherboard connector and WITHOUT a newer PSU with 24pin plug. The card gets enough power already and does not REALLY need the power from the PSU plug.

    Thats why the newer boards are USUALLY comaptible with either 20pin PSUs or 24pin PSUS.

    [As a sidenote] A pci-express card with NO external power connector which would get the power solely from the pci-port can (therefore) only draw a max. 72W. The current high-end cards all draw much more power. Eg. a Geforce 6800 Ultra is listed as using as much as 110 Watts. There is no way to do this with just the power coming from the 6A/72Watts rated pci-slot

    (Q) But wouldnt it be just better to get a newer ATX 2.0 24pin PSU which is "pci-express ready" ?
    First..."pci-express" ready is just a stupid market term. See above. It doesnt need to bother you if the graphics card has an external connector and you got a good strong 20pin PSU.
    "pci-express ready" will usually only mean that the PSU will have a 6pin pci-express power plug. Which is not bad and saves you the hassle to get the adapter in case the card does NOT come with one.

    Another advantage of the newer ATX 24pin PSUSsis that they USUALLY have dual, separate 12V rails. (One 12V rail provides power for eg. CPU, the other rail is separate and provides power for the pci-express card.)
    This is not necessarely bad In other words: You cant go wrong with a new 24pin PSU for various reasons. But this does not mean that your older 20pin one is obsolete. Especially not if its a good brand name one with suffcient power.

    (Q) I got a 20pin PSU and i will get the "xyx" motherboard which uses a 24pin connector. So...i can get one of these PSU "20pin -> 24pin adapters" to make my old 20pin PSU 24pin compatible ?

    See above. I dont THINK you really need one. But..there are certain *concerns* regarding this "20pin to 24pin" adapter. Do NOT confuse with the "24pin -> 20pin" adapter which often comes with new ATX 2.0 motherboards.

    The 20pin->24pin PSU adapter will split your ONE rail/wire (eg. the 12V rail) coming from your PSU in two and create the "artificial" extra 4 pins.

    The result is that your PSU will draw much more power from the one rail than it was originally intended to. While a real "dual rail" PSU will provide two seperate rails the solution with the adapter will draw twice the power now from one 'wire'.
    What was rated at 72W max. before (remember ? 6A * 12V = 72 W) will now all of a sudden draw up to a max. of 144 watts.
    Also..the thermal load (eg. heat !) will increase 4 (four !) times.
    The most strain wil be on the adapter/plugs itself. You will get some nice, hot wires and plugs...

    I cannot see this as an elegant solution - HOWEVER it might work.
    But remember: You probably wont even NEED the adapter.

    Just plug your 20pin old PSU plug in the new 24pin connector on the mobo (its downwards compatible !) the right way...leave the four extra pins out. This SHOULD work and you wont really need an 20p -> 24p adapter !

    (Q) My older 20 pin PSU has this extra 4pin connector with the two yellow and two black wires ? Can i use this to "fill up" the missing 4 pins on the 24pin connector on the motherboard ? Isn't that what it's for ?

    NO NO NO..DONT EVEN THINK ABOUT IT !!!

    This is the 12V CPU connector which you use to provide juice to the CPU, there is another 4 pin connector on the motherboard especially for this.
    Dont even think about using this (YES, i saw people considering this option!) - except you need a sure way to fry your board !

    There is a smaller (?) number of newer 24pins PSUs out there who actually *do* have
    detachable 4 extra pins on the main connector - so you can attach it to the 20pin connector and have a 24pin connector.

    But even if it might look about the same....do NOT confuse this with the 4pin 12V CPU connector !

    the reason why many people might run into problems with their older 20 pin PSUs is that MANY (even brand name) PSUs are rather weak on the 12V rails.
    15A or 18A PSUs with only ONE rail are (still) quite common.

    Now picture a graphic card using 110 W under load which would be a power draw of 9.2 A alone for the card ! (Assuming it would all come off the 12V rail).

    If your PSU has only 15A on the rail...well...subtract 9.2A and this doesnt leave MUCH for the rest of the system, ESPECIALLY if you overclock !
    You will run into problems, but not primarly because you dont have the 24pin connector.
    A 20pin -> 24pin PSU adapter would not "magically" provide more power/amperes and not solve your problem.

    Either consider a new PSU with dual rails with TWO 12V rails with *at least* 15A on EACH rail...or a STRONG 20pin PSU with plenty Amps on ONE rail...at least 25A or more !

  15. #15
    Ultimate Member Jarhed7276's Avatar
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    Thanks, JP. That cleared up some misconceptions I had.

    If the PSU uses a 24 pin connection and you use a PCI-X card, would you still plug in the external power to the card?

  16. #16
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    JP, I read that last night -- still leaves at least one open question -- quote: "The result is that your PSU will draw much more power from the one rail than it was originally intended to. While a real "dual rail" PSU will provide two seperate rails the solution with the adapter will draw twice the power now from one 'wire'.
    What was rated at 72W max. before (remember ? 6A * 12V = 72 W) will now all of a sudden draw up to a max. of 144 watts.
    Also..the thermal load (eg. heat !) will increase 4 (four !) times.
    The most strain wil be on the adapter/plugs itself. You will get some nice, hot wires and plugs...

    I cannot see this as an elegant solution - HOWEVER it might work.
    But remember: You probably wont even NEED the adapter."
    [end quote]

    The wires are 18 ga which would handle 90 watts or so. This is not to consider the twin rails going to the "new" 4 pin connector. This is to supply power to the CPU, and whatever else, who knows without a schematic.

    I have contacted ANTEC. I bought their case because they said "ATX-12v ready." But aparently their stuff is not "ATX-12v version: 2.0 or 2.01 ready." So, I am after them for an adaptor or to swap out the power supply altogether. This is my first build; I don't want to compromise here.

    Lastly, the little 6600 vid card should not draw any more than 60-70 watts. Should be fine. To Antec's credit, there is what I believe to be a header for a high current draw PCI-E card.

    I will post when there is final resolution because this is bound to come up again and again with all the new mobos out there.
    Last edited by Zoltar; April 19th, 2005 at 06:48 AM.

  17. #17
    Ultimate Member proffit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zoltar
    the 24 pins has something to do with the PCI-Ex16 buss.
    dont think so. my agp mobo asus a8v deluxe has a 24 pin the trick was finding the extra 2 pins comeing from th power supply and plugging them in aswell. but if asus say useing 20 pins will work then listen to them they must know some thing about the motherboards they make. as for the 24 pin converter i am not to sure about that i think it would put more strain on the power supply.
    if it is not broken, play with it till it is.

  18. #18
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    yeah, I'm going to leave the final word to ASUS and see also what ANTEC says about it. I am not worried about the power supply itself. It has 21 amps on the 12v rails, lots of power. It's just getting it to the right place that is the issue, like the post from Amandtech, you don't want to over-heat the wires!

    Further reading for those who are concerned about power rating of the PCI-E buss:

    ...the maximum amount of power a graphics card may get from the PCI Express x16 slot is about 75W, although originally a smaller value (like 60W) was proposed. The developers must have miscalculated the rate of the power consummation growth of modern graphics cards and had to adjust the specification, assigning more contacts for transferring electricity and raising the consumption bar to 75W.

    Graphics cards in the “desktop” PCI Express variant are powered by two lines, 3.3v and 12v. The specification of the PCI Express x16 slot sets the maximum currents on these lines at 3amp and 5.5amp, respectively. The total power consumption on these lines, i.e. the maximum consumption of a graphics card without additional power connectors, is easily calculated to be 75.9W.

    Maximum sample power consumption specs:
    nvidia GeForce 6600 GT: 51 watts.
    nvidia GeForce 6800 ultra: 72 watts.


    Source: http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/vid...00gt-oc_2.html

    Conclusion: No fried wires possible.
    Last edited by Zoltar; April 19th, 2005 at 07:41 AM.

  19. #19
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    I'm having EXACT the same problem... (same case and mobo)

    I was woundering if and how it's working by now?

  20. #20
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    fIRSTLY: JPMiller, You are truly gifted with knowledge and patients to take the time to write for us.

    And thank you ALL for sharing - this helped me find the answer about the 20-pin / 24-pin issue. I Just bought the Asus A8N-E and my FIRST AMD chip (Athlon 64 3800 939) and the power supply from the coolermaster case came with the 20-pin and the 4-pin combo and I thought the thing was going to get damaged at power on, but it did not. But then, after installing the drivers (including the RAID drivers, even though I do not have RAID) I started to get errors when opening IE. And I went to bed thinking that i fried something.

    Then I had dreams of vixens with horns and pointed boobies and red animals eating molten lava... ahhh .. oh..

    Anyway, I am running Windows XP Pro SP1. Does anyone know why I would get this crash? I guess SP2? Should I uninstall the firewall software? Should I uninstall the RAID driver?

    bye 4 now

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