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Thread: Klipsch???

  1. #41
    shahani
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    My new TDK USB 2 burner has a propietary software to rip CDs - gotta try it tonite.

  2. #42
    Ultimate Member shawshank62's Avatar
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    I have noticed that some suck, and others are good, but it is hard to find ones above 128. And i do try at kazaa. To convert my mp3's to wma i use nero. Is this a good program for that or could i do better.

    BM

  3. #43
    shahani
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    I think Nero's OK. Lots of programs out there. Read this too:

    http://webhome.idirect.com/~nuzhathl/mp3-faq.html

  4. #44
    nuisance since 1968 OuTpaTienT's Avatar
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    Why would you want to convert to WMA? You're losing quality when you do.

    Read http://r3mix.net/ for the scoop on mp3s and encoders.

    Check out the newsgroups for a source of high quality (160-320kbps) mp3s.

  5. #45
    Ultimate Member crazyray's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    Some of the same things keep coming up in these threads...
    • *Sound card quality is important.
      *MP3's at 128 CBR don't really sound that good. I agree that EAC and LAME offer the best sound quality available via MP3, but higher bitrates do sound better. How you listen and what equipment you use will affect how you respond to that statement.
      *The best computer sound I've gotten didn't use any of the speakers mentioned. I plugged into the AUX input on an old receiver and connected a decent pair of Polk bookshelf speakers. Better sound and better bass than any PC system I've heard.
      *Power specs on PC speaker systems are about as meaningful as power specs in car audio. Easy to lie and get away with it.


    Your mileage may vary.

  6. #46
    Ultimate Member shawshank62's Avatar
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    I should just leave my mp3's alone and not convert them when i put on cd's? Will the sound quality still be....adjusted or fixed? Also, will a regular cd player play them or do i need something like a rio?

    BM

  7. #47
    shahani
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    Regular CD player will play them if they are not in the mp3 format.

  8. #48
    Ultimate Member shawshank62's Avatar
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    I noticed that the sound is very low when i download mp3's, when i put then on a cd will the sound be...loudened? Does anyone understand what i am saying, or should i just turn the volume up more.

    BM

  9. #49
    nuisance since 1968 OuTpaTienT's Avatar
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    For a regulation audio CD then the tunes can't remain in mp3 format. But there are really only two options of what should be done to mp3 files when burning an audio cd...

    1. Do nothing. Most application that can burn audio CDs have no problem automatically converting the mp3s to the correct audio format as they burn. Nero does this I know.

    2. If you wish, you can convert the mp3s manually yourself. All you need to do is convert them to uncompressed WAV format. Then just use your burning software to produce an audio CD.

    The format you were converting to, WMA is also a compressed format just like MP3 is. So converting from one of those formats to the other is not really a good idea unless you have some reason for it being in a specific format. I say it's not a good idea because that process involves uncompressing the audio and then recompressing the audio in the other format. You already lost tons of data wheneven the file was originally compressed to mp3 (or whatever format it's first in). But when you recompress a file then you are starting to severely affect it's audio quality. Just like in the old days, a copy of a copy of a copy is always worse then a copy of the original.

    But digital audio shouldn't degrade like that no matter how many copies you make...right? That is right, IF you are always using uncompressed raw audio data, like the raw WAV files you get when you rip a CD. But those are just too huge to deal with. So compression is a necessity. But recompression should be avoided at all cost.

    However, UNcompression does no harm to the audio data. Like going from mp3 (compressed) format to WAV (uncompressed) format does no harm. That WAV file will sound no worse than the mp3 file it came from. But also it will sound no better.

    I think I'm going in circles here. Does that make sense?

  10. #50
    Ultimate Member shawshank62's Avatar
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    I think i understand, when you rip these files it dosent sound better or worse. The best way to burn would be keeping them in mp3. Got it. Thx.
    (at least i think i got it)

    BM

  11. #51
    Ultimate Member crazyray's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    Shawshank...have you ever seeen a Divx movie off the net? It didn't look as good as the DVD it was ripped from because it was COMPRESSED. An MP3 is a music file that has been compressed. In both cases, this causes a loss of detail that you may find acceptable. Converting an MP3 to WAV and burning it to CD will not have any effect on the sound quality, but it will now be in a form that is playable on normal CD players.

    Converting an MP3 to another compressed format (such as WMA) can only result in more loss of detail.

    Make any sense?

  12. #52
    shahani
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    This is the utility I use:

    http://www.mp3converter.biz/

    I find it the best overall.

  13. #53
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    Klipsch 5.1 PROMEDIA ULTRA THX CER

    Klipsch LOUD SPEAKERS. Cambridge does'nt make REAL powerful speakers, they are a soundcard company hence they specialize in sound quality and realism.

    Turn the Klipsch up to max volume and you will be amazed by the power and control of the speakers.

    Turn the Cambridge up to max volume and you will be amazed by the subwoofers farting power... literally it's not making bass anymore... it's just farting...

  14. #54
    Ultimate Member [Neo770]'s Avatar
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    Thats helpfull but the original question was asked 3 years ago.
    (\(\
    (o'.')
    (,,)('')('')

  15. #55
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    I've owned two sets of Klipsch speakers. the 4.1's and the RF 3 II's. The 4.1's were definitely loud. The subwoofer couldn't replicate its data accurately, however, at higher volumes and lower frequencies. Four speakers will DEFINITELY be a more enriching sound than two, since you are able to hear behind you as well as in front of you. Remember, too, that placement of your subwoofer will have a very significant effect on the sound pressure you will experience from it based on its position and your position in the room. There are excel spreadsheets, I believe, that you can download in order to 'even out' the frequencies.

    Klipsch, historically, has been known to build very high efficiency (loud) speakers, but at the cost of either clarity or mid-range (the 'singing' band of frequencies). This can be very important, if you primarily listen to music and love the melodic portion of your songs. If this is the case, I recommend against, at least, older models of Klipsch. Check out whether the midrange is good and *balanced*, decide how loud you can turn it before your neighbors abruptly end your ability to listen to anything, let alone your music or games, and then decide.

    Klipsch speakers are cool because they are stylish and loud. But as a music lover, even owning the rather clear sounding RF 3 II's, I've learned that style and flair are not as important as beauty. I could make a parallel to sexual preference here, but I'll leave you to ponder it yourself. Anyway, if you love music, and not toys, buy for sonic beauty, not style.
    If Klipsch hasn't changed their target market in the last 3 years, please consider other brands.

    Speakers are pretty good these days, and you will likely hear pretty good music, no matter which you buy.

    If you like first person shooters, however, nothing can beat the response time of headphones, both in their lack of amplification and the less time and distance which sound has to exist and travel before being processed by you.

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