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Topic Review (Newest First)

  • January 23rd, 2015, 10:14 PM
    Theophylact
  • January 18th, 2015, 12:25 PM
    Theophylact
    The Philosopher's Apprentice, by James Morrow.
  • January 16th, 2015, 05:53 PM
    Theophylact
    The Just City, by Jo Walton.
  • January 15th, 2015, 02:59 PM
    Theophylact
    Love, etc. by Julian Barnes (sequel to Talking it Over).
  • January 11th, 2015, 09:31 AM
    nunyadam
    Matter finished, Surface Detail started.
  • January 9th, 2015, 03:48 PM
    nunyadam
    I like the Culture series, but this one has been a bit harder to get into. It seemed to take forever to get all the Characters introduced and background in place.
  • January 9th, 2015, 03:40 PM
    Theophylact
    I loved Iain M. Banks (and also Iain Banks). He was a great loss...
  • January 9th, 2015, 03:21 PM
    nunyadam
  • January 9th, 2015, 02:19 PM
    cunokyle
    https://www.bing.com/search?setmkt=e...ovenant+series

    Currently on Book #8 of the series.
  • January 8th, 2015, 11:22 PM
    Networker4321
    not a fan by kyle idleman Semi-religious novel about not just going to church, but being a true Christian. Written extremely well.
  • January 8th, 2015, 12:49 PM
    Theophylact
    Talking it Over, by Julian Barnes, and Galapagos Regained, by James Morrow.
  • December 23rd, 2014, 05:43 PM
    Networker4321
    Hey TRB!

    Merry Christmas! Are you still at Fort Drum? Or are you in Afghanistan?

    Can't go wrong with a Baldacci book.

    I'm currently reading Gray Mountain by John Grisham. Maybe his best ever. Just finished Killing Patton​ by Bill O'Reilly. Way more detail than I needed,,, :-)

    Keep your head down buddy....

    Net
  • December 23rd, 2014, 06:54 AM
    The Real Bingo
    The Target by David Baldacci.
  • December 20th, 2014, 02:50 AM
    Networker4321
    Killing Patton by Bill O'Reilly (and a co-writer) Mixed feelings about Bill but I watch him and he is an arrogant @ss but is topical and mostly interesting. If you don't enjoy a painful level of detail, don't buy this book. I thankfully bought it as an e-book.....
  • December 19th, 2014, 06:56 PM
    Theophylact
    Just finished Lud-in-The-Mist, by Hope Mirrlees. About to start Afternoon Men, by Anthony Powell.

    Also, now that I've finished Inherent Vice, I really wanna see the movie.
  • December 2nd, 2014, 07:42 PM
    Networker4321
    So, Anyway by John Cleese ( Actually took delivery of the hardcover, so enjoyable to hold and read as opposed to Kindle )

    BUY THIS BOOK!
  • December 2nd, 2014, 09:54 AM
    Theophylact
  • November 14th, 2014, 11:03 AM
    tony_j15
    We started a book exchange library at work, so now I keep a tome at my desk to peruse while waiting on video to render. Started on Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.
  • November 13th, 2014, 09:13 PM
    Networker4321
    Quote Originally Posted by Theophylact View Post
    Haven't quite finished it yet. But it's very powerful and oddly hallucinatory.

    It reminds me of Primo Levi's account of survival in Auschwitz. Thirsty, he broke off an icicle to suck on, and a guard snatched it from him. "Warum?" he asked, and the guard replied, "Hier ist kein warum": there is no why here.

    North Korea sounds a lot like that; the entire country sounds like a concentration camp.

    N. Korea IS like that. Been there on a TS technology swap. Counld't talk about it 4 twenty-five years. Even the roads are "guarded?" by these huge Stonehenge like slabs at regular intervals with a huge slab on top wired to explosives. Supposed to deter North bound but I believe it's for stopping Southbound traffic. It's like medieval times, no electricity anywhere except a few government buildings and that seemed to be generators. And they have not recovered like the South from the 30 year occupation/rape of the country by Japan. They cut every tree, mined every mineral....

    We have been to the three biggest concentration camps in W. Germany. Based out of there 74-76 but plainclothes and undercover over 1/3 of the world. Bought a new Dodge Van and weekends I was home we traveled to every little village and surrounding countries to the South. Lots of great breweries in every town. Worst bier ever was "Wolfsbier" from Wurzburg. Never developed a taste for beer in the US. When I did drink it was always Jack Daniels, we lived about 20 miles from the distillery in Lynchburg.

    I usually keep 3-4 novels going at once, might as well pull The Orphan Master's Son down to a Kindle reader. Pretty cool that all devices sync to that app so I can read wherever or even go "audible" in the car....
  • November 13th, 2014, 02:45 PM
    Theophylact
    Haven't quite finished it yet. But it's very powerful and oddly hallucinatory.

    It reminds me of Primo Levi's account of survival in Auschwitz. Thirsty, he broke off an icicle to suck on, and a guard snatched it from him. "Warum?" he asked, and the guard replied, "Hier ist kein warum": there is no why here.

    North Korea sounds a lot like that; the entire country sounds like a concentration camp.
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