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Topic Review (Newest First)

  • March 20th, 2012, 08:43 PM
    CERuppel
    Looking into something very similar here on my end. Need to back up around 5 to 7 gig of files that would need to be synced between at least a dozen computers. This might be just the solution.

    And on topic, I would very much suggest the multiple back up method. And if you are using the same media, store them seperately (one DVD here, the copy DVD somewhere else...).
  • March 20th, 2012, 08:03 PM
    J1mmy
    If I was you I'd create a library of DVD's seeing as they're PDF's, a sort of virtual library in a way. You could make multiple copies of the DVD. Hard drives can fail, online storage companies can go bankrupt and corrupt your data during their own housekeeping tasks.

    10GB isn't very much at all (you can probably stick them all on google docs for dirt cheap with 20G limit I think)
  • March 20th, 2012, 05:31 PM
    tony_j15
    Here's how I approach it: all backups can fail, so the best approach is multiples. For my important documents (taxes, receipts and the like) I keep a hard copy filed in a file box (when I have the funds this will be upgraded to a fire-safe cabinet). I use DropBox to keep my documents synched across all my PCs and iPhone so that they are always available. Every year I backup the documents to DVD. Overkill? Probably. But I would have to have my apartment burn down and the Internet cease to exist to loose everything. If you want to take it a step farther you could rent a small safe box at a bank and store the DVDs/CDs/ HDD/Jumpdrive there.
  • March 20th, 2012, 02:57 PM
    SpaceSquad
    I think GroundZero has a point...online storage is cheap nowadays and they do backups of your backups for you.

    Alternatives I can think of is redundant home file servers (hard disks fail a lot), tape-backup(drives are expensive), or "high-quality" dvds...though even the best have a finite existence.
  • March 20th, 2012, 02:11 PM
    Digi5
    Quote Originally Posted by GroundZero3 View Post
    Any particular reason why? Just curious
    I suppose it's the feeling of it "being out of my hands" and the intangibility of it. If I were to put the data on dvds then I could stow them away and I'd know where it was, and even if the entire internet crashed I'd still have them.
  • March 20th, 2012, 02:08 PM
    GroundZero3
    Any particular reason why? Just curious
  • March 20th, 2012, 02:07 PM
    Digi5
    Quote Originally Posted by GroundZero3 View Post
    How much data are you wanting to backup? Have you looked into some of the online storage solutions?
    About 10 GB. I haven't, although if I did find one, I wouldn't want it to be my primary means of backing up my data.
  • March 20th, 2012, 02:02 PM
    GroundZero3
    How much data are you wanting to backup? Have you looked into some of the online storage solutions?
  • March 20th, 2012, 02:02 PM
    Digi5
    Quote Originally Posted by tony_j15 View Post
    Every backup system has its pros and cons. Some of the problems you will run into with long-term backups is how quickly file formats change. What sort of files are you planning on backing up? PDFs and jpegs seem to have a longer shelf life compared with more proprietary files, and there are quite a few programs that can do recovery on these file types.

    So what is your goal or purpose with this backup? And how much are you willing to spend?
    I'm planning to backup a bunch of pdfs. My goal is to have every file intact for indefinite future (until pdfs go out of fashion anyways). As for how much I'm willing to spend... $100-$200 I suppose. I'm not really sure how much one is expected to spend on something like this. I'm not averse to upkeep costs, this is important to me.




    Quote Originally Posted by Chiguy View Post
    Perhaps you can generate a hash value for the files and if it changes, you'll know the file was changed in some way.
    That sounds complicated.
  • March 20th, 2012, 01:43 PM
    Chiguy
    Perhaps you can generate a hash value for the files and if it changes, you'll know the file was changed in some way.
  • March 20th, 2012, 01:03 PM
    tony_j15
    Every backup system has its pros and cons. Some of the problems you will run into with long-term backups is how quickly file formats change. What sort of files are you planning on backing up? PDFs and jpegs seem to have a longer shelf life compared with more proprietary files, and there are quite a few programs that can do recovery on these file types.

    So what is your goal or purpose with this backup? And how much are you willing to spend?
  • March 20th, 2012, 05:03 AM
    Steve R Jones
    Files sitting around on a cd/dvd or hard drive don't just get corrupt. The media might

    In the event of something going wrong - a file that isn't compressed would be a little easier to recover.
  • March 20th, 2012, 01:01 AM
    Digi5

    Long-term data storage and file integrity

    Hello everyone,

    First of all, I'm not very literate when it comes to computers. I'm playing to store a large number of files with the long-term in mind. What storage media would be the most approapriate? CDs/DVDs seem to fragile for the task. No matter the choice, I'll need to reupload my files onto a new media every few years to prevent obsolence and data degradation.

    Data degradation raises some concerns for me. How would I be able to check if some of my files have becomes corrupt over the years and between all those transfers? As there are thousands of files, manually checking all of them unfeasible.

    I was thinking of compressing them with WinRAR so I only have to deal with one file instead of thousands. However, is it possible for files within the archive to become corrupt even if the archive opens successfully? Is it an "all of nothing" sort of thing where the archive decompresses perfectly or not at all? Essentially what I'm asking is, if years from now the .rar file opens successfully, is it guaranteed to be as good as the original?

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