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  1. #1
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    DELL LATITUDE D610 - POWER ON Problem

    I've got a Dell Latitude D610 and the POWER ON button does not turn on the laptop. I do have a docking station that when I dock the laptop I can power on the laptop. I can then remove it from the docking station and it works great with the exception of the power on button. It just does not work.

    Is the power button on a seperate card or is it part of the motherboard? Has anyone seen this problem and how can it be fixed?

  2. #2
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    Have you figured out anything yet? I have the same problem except I don;t have a docking station. I just bought a refurbished one for my daughter.

  3. #3
    THE Gimp Clown Fish! nemowolf's Avatar
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    The power on button should be connected to the motherboard via a pair of wires. If your handy with a soldering iron, you could check the connections and solder them again.

  4. #4
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    S3-STS

    Remove the bezel at the top of the keyboard where the power button is. Under it will be a board that has the power button along with the lights for Num Lock, Caps Lock, and Scroll Lock. There should be three screws that hold this board on, one of which will go through the laptop casing/bezel.

    Push down on the board just to the right of this screw, and above the large silver screw that holds the processor heat sink on (this does not connect to the power board in any way). The laptop should power on now. When you release pressure, the num lock light should shut off.

    The only fix Iíve found that works so far is to add a few small washers to the screw on the right that holds the board on.I donít know what the cause of this issue is, but I suspect the heat pipes that run under this board are the cause.

  5. #5
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    Root cause of the problem

    I have the same problem with my D610, found out that over the year being using it, the connector to the motherboard connecting to the power switch, the soldering has broken off. Fix by re-soldering the legs

  6. #6
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    Unhappy Please Help Dell Latitude d610

    Hi, I have a similar problem to the one which you explained below, except when I touch the two screws the laptop doesn't go on. Can I replace the power button board on my dell latiude though? I can get a new one, but does it just fit right in and work? Please let me know, and also if there is any way to bypass this switch just to get the laptop on?? I really need it on, but can't.
    kennjame62@gmail.com Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by S3-STS View Post
    Remove the bezel at the top of the keyboard where the power button is. Under it will be a board that has the power button along with the lights for Num Lock, Caps Lock, and Scroll Lock. There should be three screws that hold this board on, one of which will go through the laptop casing/bezel.

    Push down on the board just to the right of this screw, and above the large silver screw that holds the processor heat sink on (this does not connect to the power board in any way). The laptop should power on now. When you release pressure, the num lock light should shut off.

    The only fix Iíve found that works so far is to add a few small washers to the screw on the right that holds the board on.I donít know what the cause of this issue is, but I suspect the heat pipes that run under this board are the cause.

  7. #7
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    Thanky ou so much!!

    Quote Originally Posted by S3-STS View Post
    Remove the bezel at the top of the keyboard where the power button is. Under it will be a board that has the power button along with the lights for Num Lock, Caps Lock, and Scroll Lock. There should be three screws that hold this board on, one of which will go through the laptop casing/bezel.

    Push down on the board just to the right of this screw, and above the large silver screw that holds the processor heat sink on (this does not connect to the power board in any way). The laptop should power on now. When you release pressure, the num lock light should shut off.

    The only fix I’ve found that works so far is to add a few small washers to the screw on the right that holds the board on.I don’t know what the cause of this issue is, but I suspect the heat pipes that run under this board are the cause.

    I had exactly the same problem for mothns now!! Pushing the board down as you described does the trick indeed! I'm registration right now just to thank you!

  8. #8
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    Alternate way to make this work

    Thanks to S3-STS below I can now use the on off switch. But I am lazy, so I figured out that once i put the cover back on, all I have to do to turn on the laptop is push firmly on the WiFi light (just above the num and caps lights and then the on-off button. Works a treat as this is exactly above the spot mentioned below but with the laptop all together. Many thanks !!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by S3-STS View Post
    Remove the bezel at the top of the keyboard where the power button is. Under it will be a board that has the power button along with the lights for Num Lock, Caps Lock, and Scroll Lock. There should be three screws that hold this board on, one of which will go through the laptop casing/bezel.

    Push down on the board just to the right of this screw, and above the large silver screw that holds the processor heat sink on (this does not connect to the power board in any way). The laptop should power on now. When you release pressure, the num lock light should shut off.

    The only fix Iíve found that works so far is to add a few small washers to the screw on the right that holds the board on.I donít know what the cause of this issue is, but I suspect the heat pipes that run under this board are the cause.

  9. #9
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    OMG THANK YOU

    Quote Originally Posted by laptop_is_back View Post
    Thanks to S3-STS below I can now use the on off switch. But I am lazy, so I figured out that once i put the cover back on, all I have to do to turn on the laptop is push firmly on the WiFi light (just above the num and caps lights and then the on-off button. Works a treat as this is exactly above the spot mentioned below but with the laptop all together. Many thanks !!!!
    I tried the way S3-STS mentioned and nothing happened.. I was giving up and caught your post just as I was about to exit out... I did just as you said and VIOLAAAAA...... like a charm ... THANK YOU THANK YOU.....

  10. #10
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    I usually just take parts of off other computers - like this Latitude for example -

  11. #11
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    Yet another working Latitude D610, little bit different solution

    Quote Originally Posted by laptop_is_back View Post
    Thanks to S3-STS below I can now use the on off switch. But I am lazy, so I figured out that once i put the cover back on, all I have to do to turn on the laptop is push firmly on the WiFi light (just above the num and caps lights and then the on-off button. Works a treat as this is exactly above the spot mentioned below but with the laptop all together. Many thanks !!!!
    Thank you all for your tips ! I also have a working on off switch again since this morning. However washers etc didn't stabilize this fuction on my D610 and experimenting further I found that pushing the board to the left also revived the on off function.

    In order to permanently push the board to the left side I have put some solder at the left side of the two metalized holes in the board. The screws now push the board to the left side just a little bit, but quite firm though. I am able to shake the laptop like when you inadvertently bump into something while transporting it, without loosing the now healthy on off function.

  12. #12
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    Yet another working Latitude D610, little bit different solution

    removed - post was inadvertently sent twice
    Last edited by GertC; November 2nd, 2010 at 11:23 AM. Reason: post was inadvertently sent twice

  13. #13
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    Thumbs up solution

    The problem comes from the female connector that is solded in the main mother board.
    The joints get worst because pushing the power button so many times.
    The solution is to reforce the solderings joints but it is necessary especial soldering tools.
    Fernando

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by laptop_is_back View Post
    Thanks to S3-STS below I can now use the on off switch. But I am lazy, so I figured out that once i put the cover back on, all I have to do to turn on the laptop is push firmly on the WiFi light (just above the num and caps lights and then the on-off button. Works a treat as this is exactly above the spot mentioned below but with the laptop all together. Many thanks !!!!
    I registered on this site just to say...THANK YOU! I've had this this laptop sitting around for months because It wouldn't power on. I have two, is the only reason, but figured I'd take one last look around to see if I could find a solution before I got rid of it. Now I think i'll look around here and see if I can find a solution to my Windows XP Bluetooth issue! Thanks again!

  15. #15
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    Smile This works!!!!!!!!!!

    Thanks to S3-STS and laptop-is-back, because an Dell D610 which works fine in docking station had bailed on me when working with laptop alone. I was at wits end and took the advice of pressing down on the wi-fi LED at the same time I pushed the power on button. Came up first time!!!

  16. #16
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    How to live with a BROKEN DELL LATITUDE D610 POWER BUTTON

    If your D610 power button is failing or broken, you may still be able to fiddle with the area around the button, and trick it into turning on, as discussed at www.techimo.com/forum/technical-support/219416-dell-latitude-d610-power-problem.html. Or use a docking station. Or try to fix the button hardware, perhaps by replacing the power button board DAJM5CYBAA1 (available used for about $15). (It is obvious that the D610 has a hardware design defect, but unclear if the problem is usually the button board itself, the connection, or something related farther down below.)

    Or -- you could just learn to live with the problem, use your computer without a working power button! Here are some details about how to do that.

    All of the below assumes that your computer is on now, or that you find some way to turn it on at least once; you can do this with a docking station or by fiddling with the area around the button. If you ever get it to turn on, it is urgent that you access the BIOS immediately (F2) and turn on the daily auto-power-on timer (set it to maybe 9am), and turn on Wake-on-LAN. As soon as these settings have been configured, you can start to relax. You know that your computer will turn on once every 24 hrs. Your next priority is to find out the MAC address. After you figure out WoL, you can get it to turn on at any time, using another computer...

    Your coping options:

    You could just LEAVE IT ON CONSTANTLY. But this approach should not be applied for more than about a week. It would be wearing out all the moving parts (the cooling fan and the hard drive) and wasting electricity (at least 15 watts, costing ~$30/yr 24/7). (It would have to be continuously plugged in.)

    The easy, practical approach is to just PUT IT TO SLEEP (STANDBY). While running Windows, just close the lid! It goes to sleep quickly, only uses about 1 watt, appears dead except for the slowly throbbing power indicator. Open the lid, it wakes up... This should be very practical for most purposes.
    . Besides closing the lid, there are many manual and auto ways to have Windows put it to sleep. This has some potential advantages. In particular, if it is put to sleep with the lid open, there is reduced danger of it getting turned on by mistake: the lid has to be closed and then reopened, or the little lid sensor can be diddled. (All of this will require experimenting with the Windows power settings.)
    . You should try to leave it plugged in as much as possible. Even with an old battery, it should run for at least an hour on, and be good for at least 24 hrs asleep. In theory. But my experience is that it could wake up and run at any time, including while you are transporting it and very much don't want it to. Even if the lid is shut! After many days of research and experiments, I have not yet learned why it seems to wake up every morning at about 3am. (Endless confusing settings: Windows Updates, Google Updates, Task Scheduler, Services, etc.) There is no sure way to make it stays asleep!
    . (When it is asleep, the lid sensor is the only manual way to wake it up; the power button would also work, except for being broken.)

    ---
    That is the end of the easy ways to manage this situation. Now for all the complex aspects.

    When the D610 is COMPLETELY OFF (not asleep etc), it is usually pretty stable. However, there are still various reasons that it might try to turn on...

    The only COMPLETELY TOTALLY STABLE situation is with the battery out and AC unplugged. To achieve this state, shut it down as gently as possible (do not pull the battery out while it is on or running in any way -- unless absolutely necessary!), then disconnect the AC and remove the battery from the bottom. Now you can safely store it indefinitely.

    Otherwise, even when it is off, it should be AC powered in general, just it case it decides to try to turn on.

    When a computer is turned on from a COLD START (completely off), it takes about a minute to run some built-in programs (self-checks), then tries to start up Windows from the hard drive. Ordinarily.

    During the brief time after it first turns on, special keys can interrupt this sequence. The F2 function key provides access to BIOS CONFIGURATION settings. As a ordinary user, you would usually want to stay far away from this, for fear of messing up some important setting. But there are special features hidden here, that you should at least be aware of. I have turned on the daily auto-start timer, and set it to 9am. If the computer is off (not asleep) and plugged in, it will start at this time. It is easy to change to any other time. It would even be feasible (tho not super-convenient) to reset this time often. If you had some reason to want to completely turn off the computer at 11am, and knew that you wanted it to start again at 3pm, you could in theory just change the setting before you turn it off, then after it turns on at the appointed hour change it again to whenever.

    I have configured the BIOS so that a CD disc will take precedence over the hard drive when booting. I have loaded a special utility CD (UBCD) in the tray. The purpose of this is to intercept control when the computer starts up, instead of always just automatically going in to Windows. For example, it is absurd to start Windows (when you don't want to), just to be able to ask the computer to shut down! There is a special way to tell UBCD to shut down the computer (FreeDOS -> poweroff).

    There are several ways to boot into Windows when you wish. The best is to use F12 whenever the computer is starting/restarting, which brings up a boot menu, and you can select the hard drive. Another simple way is to press the CD tray button and pop out the tray slightly. In this state, whenever the computer starts/restarts, it will not be able to access the CD, and will then try to boot the hard drive.

    The most obscure and technical way to start up the computer is with the Wake-on-LAN (WoL) feature, which I have enabled in the BIOS. This allows a special signal to be sent from another computer via network wire, to tell the D610 to turn on. Very nifty, not very relevant to ordinary life -- but nice to know that it is possible, when all else fails. (This feature only works on AC, and can require unplugging and replugging the AC to make the magic function!) The free Windows program RemoteRebootX works to send the WoL signal, and even works with a simple direct Cat 5/6 cross-over cable connection, no real network required. The hard part is figuring out the MAC address of the ailing computer, and then fiddling with RemoteRebootX (confusing due to the lack of documentation).

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